Emily and Drew Photo Booth Crazy Fun

We were happy to be invited to Emily and Drew’s Wedding with our Photo Booth.  People have so much fun inside the booth and love to get the photo strip immediately which they keep as a treasured memento with a custom logo at the bottom of the strip.  Also, right after the photos are taken they appear on our iPad for social media purposes.  A “buzz” can be created as friends near and far participate by viewing and commenting on the photos.  This is also how party goers can get a digital copy right away, a lot of fun.  We are constantly adding to the fun and fanciful accessories that people dress up with i.e. large colored boas, hats, many types and sizes of sunglasses, mustaches on sticks and a very popular tiara.

Photo booths have been around for a very long time.  They have always been a marvel of technology being coin operated and full of chemicals to develop the photos.

According to Wikipedia:

The patent for the first automated photography machine was filed in 1888 by William Pope and Edward Poole of Baltimore. The first known really working photographic machine was a product of the French inventor T. E. Enjalbert (March 1889). It was shown at the World Fair in Paris in 1889. The German born photographer Mathew Steffens from Chicago filed a patent for such a machine in May 1889. These early machines were not reliable enough to be self-sufficient. The first commercially successful automatic photographic apparatus was the “Bosco” from the Inventor Conrad Bernitt of Hamburg (Patented July-16-1890). All these early machines produced ferrotypes. The first photographic automate with negative and positive process was invented by the German Carl Sasse (1896).

The modern concept of photo booth with (later) a curtain originated with Anatol Josepho (previously Josephewitz), who had arrived in the U.S. from Russia in 1923.[1] with the first photo booth appearing 1925 on Broadway in New York City. For 25 cents, the booth took, developed and printed 8 photos, a process taking roughly ten minutes. In the first six months after the booth was erected, it was used by 280,000 people. The Photomaton Company was created to place booths nationwide. On March 27, 1927, Josepho was paid $1,000,000 and guaranteed future royalties for his invention

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